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Tag Archive: Tenant

Can a tenant win an eviction?

Can a tenant win an eviction?

It depends. Usually no, but sometimes they can.

When can they?

When the landlord has not followed the legal eviction procedure.

Can you give examples of this?

When the landlord does not properly deliver written notices, otherwise known as eviction letters, to the tenant, before going to court.

When the landlord does not make out a case in his eviction application that it is just and equitable for the tenant to be forcibly removed from the property.

When the landlord unjustifiably infringes upon the tenant’s rights.

What kind of tenant rights can the landlord infringe for a tenant to win an eviction?

Their rights given to them in terms of a valid lease agreement, the overriding laws such as the Rental Housing Act, some times the Consumer Protection Act, and ultimately, the Prevention of Illegal Evictions Act.

Are there any other property laws that could apply to help the tenant win an eviction?

Yes, depending on the legal relationship between the landlord and tenant, other laws can apply, such as ESTA.

When does ESTA apply?

See this article for more.

What can a landlord do to ensure he wins against the tenant?

Eviction law is not about winning or losing. It is about striking a balance between opposing legal interests in the most fair and equitably way possible.

Does this mean that you are not willing to fight for a landlord to get their property back?

Definitely not.

How so?

It just means that one must appreciate the underlying purpose of eviction law, in the resolution of the eviction equation.

What is the underlying purpose?

Where a tenant does not fix their breach of the lease, the property owner deserves to get his property back from the tenant, but needs to do so in a legal way, by following the legal eviction process.

That way, he will always “win” in terms of regaining possession his property, but done in a way that appreciates any vulnerability and humanitarian concerns.

How does a landlord appreciate these concerns?

He does not need to actively do this per se, but needs to passively observe this, by appointing a legal advisor and representative who can apply the laws designed to respect these concerns.

What does then mean for the landlord?

He needs to appoint a specialist eviction attorney who can apply the eviction laws in the most efficient way possible, to accelerate the inevitable outcome of getting his property back by order of court. This way time, energy and stress can be best saved.

How long does an eviction take?

In general, it can take 6 weeks to 3 months, if all goes perfectly. Longer, if there are delays in the process, by role players along the way like the court, or sheriff, and if documents go missing.

What if the tenant opposed the process?

Then the hearing date will be pushed out by a month or two (depending on the individual court queue).

What can be done to curb the delays by the tenant opposing the process?

A legal strategist needs to be appointed to proactively manage the opposed process in a way to encourage timeous settlement of the matter out of court.

How does he do this?

There are leverage points in the litigation process/procedure that can be used to a litigators advantage; there is also a cost benefit analysis that can be put to the tenant – if they can be persuaded that they can save themselves a legal cost order by not opposing the eviction, then the matter can be settled in a shorter time by agreement, savings costs.

Who can we contact to get help with legal advice, strategy and representation with the eviction equation?

You can contact us at SD Law, as we are a law firm, operating nationally, offering landlords and tenants legal advice, and representation with the eviction process.

How do I get help?

The first best step is to call us on +27 (0) 86 099 5146 or email us at simon@sdlaw.co.za to set up an initial hour consultation by phone.

Then we can explain the exact process that needs to be followed for a landlord or a tenant to successfully resolve the eviction equation.

Any final thoughts?

Like a divorce, there are no winners per se in evictions; the issues usually stem from social and economic problems.

These are what the eviction laws and processes are designed to redress, that is, in a just and equitable way for all.

This means following the eviction legal process efficiently and professionally: that is, with assertion, not aggression, and ultimately: with compassion, not complacency.

Then landlord and tenant can both be set free.

Simon Dippenaar, Attorney of the High Court, Founder of SD Law South Africa.

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Lockdown level 4 – what now for evictions and moving house?

As lockdown restrictions ease, what does it mean for the rental market?

evictions - what happens under lockdown level 4

Lockdown level 4 – are evictions allowed? The easing of the rigorous lockdown rules that governed us for five weeks was met with rejoicing by most South Africans, particularly those with dogs and athletes who were missing their daily runs/cycle rides. More business categories are now deemed “essential” and some people have been able to return to work, albeit under very strict conditions. Most normal daily activities remain prohibited or restricted, but new rules were announced on 7 May, in Government Gazette 43293, allowing the movement of persons and goods under certain conditions. This includes moving house.

Let’s look at what you – whether you are tenant or landlord – can and can’t do under level 4.

Moving house during lockdown level 4 

As of 7 May, up until 7 June, you may move to a new property, provided the lease was signed before or during the lockdown period or the transfer of the property was completed before the lockdown. This includes movement across provincial borders. Furthermore, you may use public transport to effect the relocation, following all other directives that apply (e.g. wearing of masks). The precise wording of the directive is as follows:

2. The purpose of these Directions is to facilitate the movement of persons and goods within and across provincial, metropolitan or district boundaries during the period of Alert level 4.
(a) The movement of persons and goods, where –

(i) new lease agreements were entered into before or during the lockdown period: or
(ii) the transfer of immovable property occurred before the lockdown period, requires a change in place of residence. including the transport of goods to a new place of residence, within the Republic.

(b) The circumstances in subparagraph (a) require the once -off movement of persons who are relocating to their new place of residence, as permitted in terms of regulation 16(5): and
(c) The transport of goods within the Republic is permitted in terms of regulation
22(1)(f).

You must have a permit during lockdown level 4

If you qualify under these directions, you must secure a permit from your local police station, indicating the household members who are relocating. To obtain the permit, you must present your lease agreement or transfer documents, as detailed below. You must travel with all relevant documents in your possession.

3. (a) A person who needs to travel to his or her new place of residence and to transport goods, which are limited to household furniture and effects, as required by the circumstances in paragraph 2 of these Directions, is permitted to do so between the period 7 May 2020 to 7 June 2020.


UPDATE 15 May!! The cut-off date of 7 June has now been removed.


(b) A person referred to in subparagraph (a) must

(i) obtain a permit to travel across provincial, metropolitan or district boundaries from the station commander of a police station or a person designated by him or her The permit must correspond to Form 1 to these Directions;
This gazette is also available free online at www.gpwonline.co.za 4 No. 43293 GOVERNMENT GAZETTE, 7 MAY 2020
(ii) indicate the persons who are part of the household who will be required to move; and
(iii) have in his or her possession the relevant lease agreement indicating the date of expiry of the old lease and the date of commencement of the new lease, or the transfer documents attesting to the change in place of residence or change of ownership of property.

Rent during lockdown level 4

If the lease has expired, and the tenant is unable to relocate immediately, they must continue to pay rent, and the lease agreement becomes a month-to-month lease. However, if a tenant is having difficulty paying rent (whether the lease has expired or is ongoing), due to loss of income, TPN Credit Bureau has created a rental recovery pack, containing all the documents needed to negotiate a payment holiday and repayment plan with a landlord. Landlords placed in difficulty with bond payments due to loss of rental income should contact their lenders. Almost all South African banks have relief packages in place to help beleaguered borrowers.

What about evictions during lockdown level 4?

Here’s where there has been some movement. The moratorium on evictions introduced at the beginning of the lockdown (level 5, although we didn’t know that term then) remains. No one can be evicted from their home under level 4. However, an application for an eviction order may be brought before the courts, which are now able to hear cases and grant eviction orders. Sheriff services have resumed. The deeds office is open and consultations related to evictions will take place.  

Therefore, an attorney is permitted to prepare an order for eviction, which may be granted during level 4. However, the order is suspended and cannot be executed until the last day of level 4. At this point we do not know when that is. It is also important to pay close attention to the official information that accompanies the announcement of level 3. Although we currently understand that evictions will be lawful under level 3, we’ve seen already that the final regulations may vary considerably from the draft or anticipated rules. 

Be like a boy scout – be prepared

If you are a landlord with outstanding tenant issues, and you were intending to commence or had already commenced eviction proceedings prior to 27 March, now would be a good time to consult with a good eviction attorney and prepare your case. You will not be able to complete the process until such time as evictions are again permitted, but you will beat the rush that is sure to ensue when the ban is lifted. We anticipate the courts will be busier than usual, as many matters have been put on hold, so you could wait a while to have your case heard. If the grounds for eviction are non-payment of rent (prior to lockdown, not caused by it), then you will delay even further the time when you can legally replace your non-paying tenant with a paying one.

Don’t be in a hurry to evict good tenants

If your tenant has previously been fully compliant with the lease agreement and has always paid rent on time, but has defaulted on rent payments due to the lockdown, we urge you to take a more sympathetic stance. Allow the tenant time to negotiate a plan with you. You may even consider waiving a month’s rent, as many landlords have voluntarily done. As recession bites, rental yields will be subdued, even if demand for properties is present. If it takes a month or two to find a new tenant, that is lost income, and you may even find you have to drop the rent to attract tenants. Better to accept an equivalent loss of income from a good tenant than to expose yourself to the unknown.

The advice of an eviction lawyer is essential – for landlords and tenants alike

SD Law & Associates are specialists in rental housing and eviction law. If you are a landlord and need help navigating these uncharted waters, we can provide expert assistance. 

If you are a tenant and are worried about your current situation, we will look into your case and advise you of your rights and your best course of action.

Contact Simon on 086 099 5146 email simon@sdlaw.co.za.

Further reading:

 

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Housing giant denies illegally evicting Rondebosch tenant

Cape Town – Social housing giant Communicare has dismissed claims that a Rondebosch tenant was unlawfully evicted.

Karabo Makgoane, who lived at the Welverdiend complex, claimed that she was unlawfully evicted by Communicare because the organisation was supposed to give her alternative accommodation.

“I have been living in the Welverdiend flat since 2017. I was retrenched and told the landlord, but he said that under no circumstances would they help me. I was then paying half of my rent until October 2018. I got served a court letter, and my first court appearance was in 2019. I did not have a legal representative.

“On May 2, I was evicted by a magistrate, who said I could leave on November 30 because of my circumstances. I was expecting Communicare to get back to me regarding alternative accommodation, as was requested by the magistrate.

“On November 30 nobody had said anything to me. I stayed because I was expecting Communicare to tell me about alternative accommodation arrangements,” said Makgoane.

Communicare spokesperson Michelle Matthee said the company had tried to accommodate her when she fell into arrears.

“The tenant has considerable arrears, well over R100 000, arising from non-payment of rental. The tenant also did not uphold previous payment agreements. After the court heard the matter, the eviction order was issued on May 21. As is reflected in the court order, Communicare was not instructed to find alternative accommodation for Ms Makgoane.

“The issue with Ms Makgoane began 18 months ago. We eventually had no other option but to hand the issue over to the courts. After a lengthy court process, on February 18, the sheriff of the court carried out an eviction of Ms Makgoane, as ordered by the court,” said Matthee.

Reprinted from the Cape Times – 2020-02-21. Emphasis/links by SD Law.

If you are not sure if your eviction is fair, we can help

We are eviction lawyers in Cape Town and Johannesburg, and we believe the landlord-tenant relationship should be built on trust. We act for both landlords and tenants and uphold the rights of each to a fair and satisfactory tenancy. If you are facing an eviction and you are not sure of your rights, contact Simon at Cape Town Eviction Attorneys on 086 099 5146 or email simon@sdlaw.co.za.

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Eviction – when can you evict a tenant?

The eviction process protects tenants, but landlords still have rights, even during the festive season

You don’t want to make your tenants homeless over the festive season, but if they fail to pay rent you are entitled to start the eviction process.

Ah…the festive season. Time for beach holidays, road trips, and long, lazy lunches. But it’s also a time of overspending and overconsumption. When the finances don’t quite stretch to the seasonal indulgences, tenants may renege on their obligation to pay rent. If you’re filled with goodness and mercy you may overlook this…for a while. But when it hits your bottom line you have a right to take action, all within the law.  A tenancy agreement is a contract. There are contractual rights and obligations on both parties. To protect your asset, you may have to initiate the eviction process.

The eviction process explained

It’s called a process for a reason. There are multiple steps involved and you must follow them in order. If you do not, you could find yourself in trouble with the law. Rental housing legislation is covered by several acts: the Rental Housing Act (and Rental Housing Amendment Act 2014), the Prevention of Illegal Eviction Act – PIE, and the Consumer Protection Act – CPA. Where the provisions of one are more generous, i.e. offer more protection to the tenant, that act prevails. In most cases the CPA has the last word. Eviction is a legal process that must be conducted via the courts and requires an eviction attorney. A landlord cannot evict a tenant without going through due process of law. 

How to evict a tenant

Assuming there is a written lease agreement in place (and even if there is not – see Verbal Lease Agreements), a breach of the conditions of the lease is sufficient cause to cancel the lease. The most common cause of lease cancellation is rent arrears. While there are circumstances that might invite you to exercise leniency, e.g. your tenant has lost their job, if you are faced with non-payment of rent purely because they have overspent at Christmas, you may be less inclined towards patience. But be aware that the law is particularly sympathetic to vulnerable people, such as children, the elderly, disabled people, or woman-headed households.

Cancelling a lease

You must give the tenant notice of the breach and a chance to rectify it…in the case of rent arrears an opportunity to make good the rent due. This is done by way of a warning in writing, giving the tenant a specified amount of time in which to remedy the breach. The time frame will be determined by the terms of the lease. If not specified, it will be 20 working days, in accordance with the CPA. If there is no written lease, the landlord must give a full calendar month’s notice. If the tenant pays up (and does not repeat this breach month after month), the matter is finished and harmony is restored.

However, if the breach is not remedied, the next step is to serve a letter of cancellation on the tenant. With luck, the tenant vacates the property at the end of the notice period. If so, you are free to find another tenant – hopefully one who can pay the rent! However, should the tenant disregard the lease cancellation, you may decide to start the eviction process. At this stage an eviction lawyer is required.

Next step – eviction 

You must apply to the court to have an eviction notice served by the sheriff on the tenant – who is now considered an unlawful occupier rather than a tenant. A court date is set and a deadline given for filing an opposing affidavit (if the unlawful occupier wants to oppose the eviction).

In court, the order will either be granted or the case will be postponed for further fact-finding. In the case of vulnerable individuals, the court may wish to be satisfied that the unlawful occupier can find alternative accommodation and/or that you have behaved fairly and reasonably throughout.

If the court is satisfied that the case for eviction is sound, the tenant/unlawful occupier will be given time to vacate the property. Only if, despite this process, they fail to vacate the property within the specified period, will the sheriff will be authorised to remove them and their belongings from the property. The cost of this will be borne by the tenant. You may not change the locks, physically remove personal property, or behave in a threatening way toward the tenant, however recalcitrant the tenant may be. Only the sheriff may take any physical action against the tenant.

Legal advice is essential

If you want to evict a tenant, you need legal representation by an experienced attorney. You can issue a notice of lease cancellation yourself, but expert advice is strongly recommended, to ensure you comply with all rental housing legislation. The law is partial to the rights of tenants, given the abuses of the past, and it is easy to fall foul of your obligations as a landlord without realising it. Simon Dippenaar and Associates, Cape Town eviction lawyers, now in Johannesburg and Durban, are specialists in rental housing law and will safeguard your rights, while also ensuring your tenants are treated fairly and with dignity. Contact Simon on 086 099 5146 or email simon@sdlaw.co.za.

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Commercial evictions: how a landlord can evict a tenant

PIE does not apply to commercial evictions, but CPA might

Legislation introduced in the last few years gives residential tenants a host of rights, and landowners or landlords must follow very strict procedures to evict tenants. However, the same is not true of commercial tenants. In some case the Consumer Protection Act (CPA) may apply, but if not, the relationship is governed by contract law.

Commercial evictions - Eviction lawyers

Landlord and commercial tenant relationship

South African contract law is derived from the Roman-Dutch law of contract. A contract is defined as an agreement between two or more parties binding them in a legal commitment. It is basically a legal framework that enables individuals or juristic persons (in other words, companies or organisations) to engage in business. They can exchange resources – such as money or their time – in the knowledge that they are protected by a legal agreement that is – or should be – fair to both parties. If one party reneges on their obligations, the other party is safeguarded by law from loss or the consequences of unlawful behaviour.

A commercial lease is a form of contract. It outlines the interests of both landlord and tenant and their duties towards each other. Properly drafted, it should facilitate a harmonious relationship between the two. Unlike residential tenancies, there is no legislation specifically governing commercial leases, so a professionally prepared, written lease is essential for avoiding misunderstanding and disputes. It is the contract as defined above.

Commercial rental is normally charged per square metre, rather than a flat rate for the premises. On top of that, there is usually a cost for the landlord’s operating costs, parking, rates and taxes, body corporate levies and insurance as well as charges based on use for electricity, water, refuse collection and sewerage. These should all be specified in the lease.

Selling the lease

If a tenant moves out without notifying the landlord and sells the lease to a new business, the new tenant is an illegal occupier. A lease is a contract between two named individuals or juristic persons. A lease can be sold, but the contract with the property owner must then be renegotiated and a new lease drawn up. Whether or not this can be done will also depend on the stipulations in the original lease.

Definition of a commercial tenant

Whether or not a tenant is considered commercial is not based on the zoning of the building but on the use of it. So someone who resides in a commercial property is considered a residential tenant and is protected by PIE. By contrast, a commercial occupant is someone who “…does not use buildings and structures as a form of dwelling or shelter”. The commercial occupant could be an organisation or an individual, and the building could be a residential structure. For example, a homeowner may let a cottage on their property to a self-employed consultant to use as an office. Although the cottage is part of a residential holding, the consultant is a commercial tenant because of the way the cottage is used.

Cancellation of a commercial lease

While commercial tenants do not enjoy the level of protection afforded residential tenants by PIE, the landlord must still follow due process. If a landlord wishes to evict a tenant, they must first cancel the lease. This can be done on expiry of the lease or on the occasion of a material breach of the terms of the agreement (usually rent arrears).

Consumer Protection Act

In some instances a commercial tenant may be protected by the Consumer Protection Act (CPA). If there is a fixed term lease, Section 14 of the CPA applies. In this scenario the landlord must give 20 business days’ written notice of a breach of the lease agreement. They may then only cancel the lease if the tenant fails to rectify the breach within the 20 days.

Section 14 does not apply in the following situations:

  • If the tenant is an organ of State (municipality, state department etc.)
  • If the landlord and tenant are both juristic persons
  • Once-off leases
  • If the tenant is a juristic person with an income/turnover above R2 million per year

In these circumstances 20 business days’ notice of a breach is not required before being able to cancel the lease.

Eviction process for a commercial tenant

Commercial evictions are handled either by the High Court or the Magistrate’s Court. The case is brought by way of action or application proceedings in the High Court and by way of action proceedings in the Magistrate’s Court. The choice of court is usually determined by the lease agreement, with the jurisdiction of the Magistrate’s Court the most common. The lease agreement must first be cancelled, as discussed above, before an eviction proceeding can be brought.

Generally, commercial evictions are effected speedily. The issues surrounding residential evictions – the rights of the occupier to a dwelling and the wellbeing of vulnerable individuals – are not at stake. By contrast, in the business context the rights of the property owner to protect commercial income take priority. But this highlights the need for a rock-solid lease to be in place. This provides the legal framework within which the eviction can take place.

Commercial evictions do not only involve the removal of the tenant. Landlords have a right to claim any damages that may apply at the time of eviction, as well as rent arrears.

Who can evict?

It is worth noting that in a commercial eviction the official landlord may not necessarily be the property owner. Commercial property is often owned by a juristic person such as a large corporation or a pension fund. Therefore an agent can act as applicant in an eviction case, as long as they can prove they have the right to appear in court on behalf of the owner (this is known in law as “locus standi”).

Landlord’s hypothec – the right to repossess tenant’s equipment

A commercial tenant does not have the same attachment to a property as a residential tenant. They still have somewhere to sleep at night, and it is not that difficult to find an alternative location for a business. For that reason, there is a greater risk that a commercial tenant might abscond when the notice to quit is served. Rather than pay the outstanding rent, the tenant might just take their moveable property and run. After all, they are not losing their home.

If a landlord is concerned that the commercial tenant might do a midnight flit, an urgent application can be brought before the Court to allow the landlord to attach and secure the movable goods on the property. If the tenant then removes them it is a criminal offence.

The security a landlord holds over a tenant’s property is known as the hypothec and is actually the strongest form of security in South African law. However, once the movable goods are removed from the property the landlord has no security over or rights to those goods. Therefore if there is reason to suspect a tenant might beat a hasty retreat, the landlord must apply for the attachment of the goods urgently. This is best done with the help of an experienced Cape Town Eviction Attorney.

Business rescue

Occasionally a landlord might not be able to commence the eviction process, even if the tenant is in breach of the lease. A business that has fallen on hard times may enter Business Rescue. This is a process that allows a business in financial distress time for rehabilitation. During this period there is a moratorium on all legal action, so an eviction notice may not be served.

What happens if the premises are sold?

There is a principle in South African law, derived from Roman-Dutch law, called “huur gaat voor koop“, which translates as “only the lease and nothing more”. What this means for the tenant is that, in the event of a sale of the building leased by the tenant, the purchaser is obliged to honour the lease agreement. The tenant may continue to occupy the building, or their part of it, according to the terms of the lease. The tenant’s rights in this situation are stronger than the right of ownership. However, the tenant should be alert to the fact that the new owner may not wish to renew the lease, depending on their plans for the property. So a wise tenant will be on the look-out for new premises well in advance of their lease expiry.

Professional help is essential

Whether you are a commercial tenant or landlord, it’s important to have a carefully drafted lease that includes all your requirements and conditions. If both parties know exactly who is responsible for what, conflict is less likely to occur. This includes the terms of renewal, which are often left open-ended in commercial leases and can be a cause for dispute as the end of the lease period draws near. Cape Town Eviction Attorneys, Simon Dippenaar & Associates, Inc. in Cape Town law firm of evictions specialists with extensive experience in property law (now serving Gauteng and Kwazulu Natal). They can ensure your lease is a sound business contract that will protect you, landlord or tenant. Contact Simon on 086 099 5146 or email simon@sdlaw.co.za.

Request a commercial lease agreement template

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Eviction – when your tenant is also your employee

In South Africa it is not uncommon for employees to be tenants. This is most often the case when a domestic worker or gardener occupies a cottage on the property of their employer. Usually the accommodation is part of the remuneration package, and often the employer pays the utilities and sometimes even provides food. The dual nature of the relationship can make things complicated if it becomes necessary to terminate one or other of those contracts, but in law the situation is straightforward.

We’ll look first at the simple application of the law, and then consider a couple of alternative scenarios.

Employment terminated

In the simplest scenario you terminate the employment of your domestic worker, including accommodation. You must give reasonable notice, compliant with the terms and conditions of employment (e.g. you may have agreed a contract stipulating 90 days’ notice). If you wish to terminate the employment prematurely and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act applies, you must give one month’s notice of termination. The employee is then required to vacate the premises provided, unless other provisions have been made. In the event of premature termination of a contract, the employee is entitled to accommodation for one month, or longer, according to the outstanding period of the contract.

Employment terminated, accommodation is extended

But perhaps the contract of employment is concluded, or the employee retires or is sick and unable to work. Their replacement does not wish to live on your premises and therefore the accommodation does not need to be vacated. You are happy for the former employee to remain a tenant. In this case the employee becomes a conventional tenant. You draw up a lease as you would for any other tenant. Whether you charge a rent or allow them to stay as a “grace and favour” tenant is between the two of you, but it is still advisable to have a written lease in place. Some families promise accommodation for life to a loyal domestic worker. If you have made this commitment in the past you are obliged to honour it, whether or not it was in writing.

Employment continues, lease is cancelled

On the other hand, you are very happy with your domestic worker, but your daughter is returning from varsity and wants to live in the property currently occupied by the employee. You wish to cancel the lease but retain the employee. In this case you are bound by the Rental Housing Act and the Consumer Protection Act. Firstly, you must check the lease agreement (or the employment contract, if the provision of accommodation is an integral part of that and not a separate agreement). You must then give notice in accordance with the provisions of the lease or employment contract. See our article Lease Agreement – How To End It With Dignity. If there is no specified notice period given, you must give one month’s notice (20 business days to be compliant with the CPA).

Eviction

If the tenant refuses to leave as requested, you may then resort to eviction. You must comply with all the statutory measures and procedures that apply to your situation, i.e. if the property is in an urban area, the Prevention of Illegal Eviction (PIE) applies (see our article on PIE). If the property is in a rural area and is subject to the Extension of Security of Tenure Act (ESTA), then the provisions of that Act must be followed.

Bear in mind that if you have to evict your employee from your property, you will place your working relationship under severe strain, making it difficult for you both to continue as employer and employee. Try to resolve the situation without resorting to eviction if you can. It may mean being flexible with the notice period to allow your tenant time to find alternative accommodation. Be aware that they now may have to travel a distance to work and be sensitive to how that might impact their start and finish times. Review the employment contract to reflect the new live-out status and consider the implications for total remuneration. If accommodation was provided gratis as part of the package, you will need to revisit the wage you pay. Make sure all contracts are up to date and represent fair and reasonable employment practices.

Take professional advice

If you need help with any aspect of lease agreements or employment contracts for your domestic workers, we can help. Cape Town Eviction Attorneys, Simon Dippenaar and Associates are experts in property and contract law. We will make sure you are fully compliant with all relevant regulations. Contact Cape Town Attorney Simon on 086 099 5146 or email simon@sdlaw.co.za.

 

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